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Why China is losing the microchip war

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07.02.2023

And why the US and China are fighting over silicon in the first place. Subscribe and turn on notifications 🔔 so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 In October 2022, the Biden administration placed a large-scale ban on the sale of advanced semiconductor chips to China. They also implemented a series of other rules that prevents China from making these chips on their own. These chips are used in everyday technology, like our mobile phones and computers. They’re also crucial to military and intelligence systems, which is one of the main reasons they're at the center of a feud between the United States and China. Microchips were first invented in the US in the 1950s, after which their use rapidly expanded worldwide. Since then, the supply chain for these chips has grown and spread to include countries in Europe and Asia. And while some countries have caught up to the US's edge in making these advanced chips, China still falls far behind despite multiple attempts to gain an advantage. Watch the latest episode of Vox Atlas to understand why China is losing a new cold war with the US over microchips. Sources and further reading: We found this book written by Chris Miller very helpful for understanding the history of chip development in the US and the foreign policy behind its competition and feud with China: Chip War: The Fight for the World's Most Critical Technology 🤍 This book gave us great context on China’s efforts to acquire foreign technology: Chinese Industrial Espionage by Anna Puglisi 🤍 Articles like this by Chien-Huei Wu helped us learn more about how much the US replies on east asian countries for successful technology: 🤍 Reporting by Bloomberg helped us understand major IP theft cases related to semiconductor chips: 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

Why the Titanic didn't have enough lifeboats

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06.02.2023

An outdated safety law may have cost hundreds of lives. Subscribe and turn on notifications 🔔 so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Ever since the Titanic sank on April 15, 1912, a major suspected culprit for the high death toll has been that there weren’t enough lifeboats on board. It’s a decision that's been dramatized as hubris on the part of the White Star Line — but the ship actually surpassed safety standards for the time. The Merchant Shipping Act of 1894 required the largest-class ships, those weighing over 10,000 tons, to carry at least 16 lifeboats. Even though the Titanic, which launched in 1911, weighed 45,000 tons, that minimum was the same. The Titanic carried 20 lifeboats, with a capacity for roughly half of the people on board the night the ship sank. Until the Titanic disaster, lifeboats weren’t seen as a substitute for an entire ship. The giant liner itself, which featured 16 compartments separated by watertight bulkheads, was supposed to stay afloat even after taking on water. Then, using a brand new piece of technology — the Marconi wireless telegraph — signal for help from a nearby ship, using lifeboats to methodically ferry passengers off the sinking ship. This scenario played out perfectly just a couple years before the Titanic disaster, when a ship accidentally rammed RMS Republic in 1909. The Republic sank, but nearly everyone on board was safely ferried off. The prevailing thought at the time was that disasters at sea had become a thing of the past. When the Titanic went down, that all changed. Just two years later, the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) mandated all passenger ships carry lifeboats for everyone on board. Today, the SOLAS requirement is 125% of a ship’s capacity. Further reading: Check out Sam Halpern’s work analyzing the permissible flooding conditions on the Titanic: 🤍 Read the 1909 news articles explaining the sinking of the Republic: 🤍 Dive into a wealth of Titanic research in “On a Sea of Glass” by J. Kent Layton, Bill Wormstedt, and Tad Fitch: 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind-the-scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

How gun laws get looser after mass shootings #shorts

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03.02.2023

State gun laws change after mass shootings all the time. And in Republican-controlled state legislatures, laws that loosen gun restrictions multiply. To watch the full version of this video, click here: 🤍 Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

2022, in 7 minutes

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27.12.2022

Running up that hill with 8 billion people. Subscribe to our channel! 🤍 In 2022, the world population crossed 8 billion people — and we felt the scale of this monumental milestone in hundreds of ways. After over two years of lockdowns and quarantines, people eagerly restarted their lives, but there were certainly growing pains. Weddings and travel skyrocketed, but so did lost luggage and global inflation rates. Taylor Swift broke Ticketmaster. Cryptocurrency was headed toward a great year until it really, really wasn’t. 2022 tested the world population as we tested out life in a new phase of the pandemic. Russia invaded Ukraine, and aid relief flooded into the war-torn country. Refugees were welcomed into surrounding countries, and those who stayed behind inspired people around the world. Global protests cried out for justice in Iran. Football teams stood up for migrant workers and the LGBTQ+ community at the World Cup. Cuba legalized same-sex marriage. The world froze for a moment when England’s longest-reigning monarch, Queen Elizabeth II, died. And we all watched a lot of TikTok. As we head into 2023, take a moment to look back at the events that defined this year. For more on 2022 from Vox.com: Alissa Wilkinson’s The 25 best movies of 2022: 🤍 Constance Grady’s Vox’s 16 best books of 2022: 🤍 Marin Cogan’s Antisemitism isn’t new. So why did 2022 feel different?: 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind-the-scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

The disastrous redesign of Pakistan’s rivers

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30.01.2023

British colonizers created a massive canal system in Pakistan — and helped cause the country’s deadly water crisis. Subscribe and turn on notifications 🔔 so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 In late summer of 2022, Pakistan experienced a devastating flooding event. An unusually severe monsoon season induced by climate change resulted in a third of the country being covered with water. Over 1,600 lives were lost, and water took months to drain out of lower-lying regions of the country, causing disease and displacement. On the flip side, Pakistan is among the most water-scarce countries in the world — expected to reach absolute water scarcity by 2025 if nothing changes. You can’t remove climate change from this equation, but an overlooked factor is the role that British engineering played in building water infrastructure along the Indus River and its tributaries, Pakistan’s sole source of surface water. A series of perennial canals, dam-like structures called barrages, and embankments were built to extract as much water from the Indus as possible and convert much of Pakistan’s arid landscape into farmland. But this water infrastructure exacerbates the destruction of flooding events and creates a hierarchical system along the canals in terms of water access. In our video, we explain the design of this water infrastructure and how Pakistan’s colonial past has made the country’s relationship with water even more precarious. Daanish Mustafa, who we interviewed for this video, co-authored a report on Pakistan’s water crisis: 🤍 We recommend The Juggernaut’s reporting on the legacy of dams in Pakistan: 🤍 For more context on how Pakistan bears the brunt of the effects of climate change: 🤍 We interview David Gilmartin for this story, who authored a book on the history of water engineering in the Indus basin: 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

Trailer: First Dates Hotel – die neuen Folgen 🥰 | VOX

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Jetzt auf RTL+ streamen: 🤍 Roland Trettl spielt endlich wieder in der Primetime Amor! Das Spin-Off der erfolgreichen VOX-Dating-Doku "First Dates - Ein Tisch für zwei" geht in die nächste Runde: Bei "First Dates Hotel" packen Singles aus ganz Deutschland auf der Suche nach der großen Liebe ihre Koffer – und checken bei Gastgeber Roland Trettl und seinem bekannten "First Dates"-Team in einem Hotel auf Mallorca zum Urlaub ein. Hier treffen die Liebessuchenden bei romantischer Atmosphäre nicht nur auf die anderen Singles, sondern auch auf ihr persönliches Blind Date, das sie bei einem Abendessen besser kennenlernen dürfen. Springt der Funke während des Dates über, kann der Aufenthalt im Hotel gemeinsam mit dem Date-Partner verlängert werden, um am nächsten Tag bei einem weiteren Rendezvous noch mehr über den anderen zu erfahren. Passt es nicht, hält der Urlaub in der Idylle vielleicht dennoch die große Liebe bereit. Denn eine zweite Chance mit einem der anderen Single-Hotelgäste ist nicht ausgeschlossen… Kanal abonnieren! 👉 🤍 Alle weiteren Infos 🤍 Habt ihr noch mehr Bock auf heißen Content🔥, dann holt euch jetzt RTL+ Premium: 🤍 VOX auf Instagram: 🤍 VOX bei Facebook: 🤍 VOX auf Twitter:🤍 RTL+ im App Store: 🤍 RTL+ bei Google Play: 🤍 RTL+ bei Amazon: 🤍 #FirstDatesHotel #VOX #RTLplus

부정부패? 정경유착? 그래도 대선은 이겼습니다! | 브라질, 브라질 대선, 룰라

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#브라질 #브라질대선 #룰라 브라질 정재계를 뒤흔든 최악의 부정부패 스캔들! 그럼에도 불구하고 대선에 이긴 대통령이 있다? 즐거움과 유익함이 가득가득, 김지윤의 지식Play! kimjyTV🤍gmail.com 📑 참고문헌 📑 BBC News. (2021, March 9). Lula: Brazil ex-president’s corruption convictions annulled. 🤍 Beauchamp, Z. (2016, March 18). Brazil's Petrobras scandal, explained. Vox. 🤍 Brito, R. (2021, April 16). Brazil’s Supreme Court confirms decision to annul Lula convictions. Reuters. 🤍 The Economist. (2022, September 30). Hailed as a saviour, derided as a thief, Lula is back. 🤍 Phillips, D., Phillips, D., & Phillips, D. (2016, September 15). Former Brazilian president Lula charged in massive corruption scandal. Washington Post. 🤍 Pooler, M. (2022, December 30). Lula picks political ally as next Petrobras chief. Financial Times. 🤍 Sims, S. (2018, October 5). The Women Who Support Bolsonaro. The Atlantic. 🤍 Spektor, M. (2018, October 26). It’s Not Just the Right That’s Voting for Bolsonaro. It’s Everyone. Foreign Policy. 🤍 이미정. (2017). 브라질 위기와 부패의 관계 : 라바자뚜 작전(Operação Lava Jato)의 함의. 포르투갈-브라질 연구, 14(2), 9-44.

Who was the first Asian nominated for Best Actress #shorts

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The first Asian to be nominated for Best Actress didn’t identify as Asian. Confused? Vox senior producer Ranjani Chakraborty explains. Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

Why blackface is still part of Dutch holidays

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24.12.2022

The debate over The Netherlands’ Zwarte Piet, explained #blackpete #zwartepiet #sinterklaas #holidays Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

The world's biggest wave, explained

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13.05.2022

And how it's transformed a Portuguese town. Subscribe and turn on notifications 🔔 so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Nazaré, Portugal was for centuries just a small fishing village known for its fishermen and dangerous seas. Then one day in 2011, a pro-surfer named Garrett McNamara strapped on a surf board and rode a 78 foot wave right off its coast. It was a new world-record for big wave surfing and the moment that changed Nazaré forever. Now, Nazaré is the capital of Big Wave surfing. The secret to Nazaré’s giant waves lies under the surface, where a huge underwater canyon funnels swells right up to its cliffs, then launches that energy straight up, sometimes 60, 70, or 80 feet. Many surfers visit in the hopes of catching a 100-foot wave. Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

The Middle East's cold war, explained

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How two feuding countries are tearing apart the Middle East. Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab: 🤍 The Saudis and Iranians have never actually declared war on each other. Instead, they fight indirectly by supporting opposing sides in other countries and inciting conflicts. This is known as proxy warfare. And it’s had a devastating effect on the region. Countries, especially poor ones, can’t function if there are larger countries pulling strings within their borders. And that’s exactly what's happening in the Middle East. The Saudi-Iranian rivalry has become a fight over influence, and the whole region is a battlefield. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Or on Facebook: 🤍

Why we all need subtitles now

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20.01.2023

It's not you — the dialogue in TV and movies has gotten harder to hear. Subscribe and turn on notifications 🔔 so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Have you ever been watching a show or movie, and then a character delivers a line so unintelligible you have to scramble to find the remote and rewind? For me, this moment came during the climax of the Pete Davidson film “The King of Staten Island,” where his most important line was impossible to understand. I had to rewind three times — and eventually put subtitles on — to finally pick up what he was saying. This experience isn’t unique — gather enough people together and you can generally separate them into two categories: People who use subtitles, and people who don’t. And according to a not-so-scientific YouTube poll we ran on our Community tab, the latter category is an endangered species — 57% of you said you always use subtitles, while just 12% of you said you generally don’t. But why do so many of us feel that we need subtitles to understand the dialogue in the things we watch? The answer to that question is complex – and we get straight to the bottom of it in this explainer, with the help of dialogue editor Austin Olivia Kendrick. Make sure you never miss behind-the-scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

Why 99% of ocean plastic pollution is "missing"

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27.04.2021

The plastic we dump into the ocean might be hiding in plain sight. Subscribe to our channel! 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍. For the past several years scientists have been trying to account for the 8 million metric tonnes of plastic that we dump into the ocean each year. The assumption was that a large portion of it was floating out in one of the large garbage patches, where swirling debris accumulates thanks to ocean gyres. But recent measurements of the amount of trash in the patches fell far short of what’s thought to be out there. Scientists are getting closer to an answer, which could help clean-up efforts and prevent further damage to marine life and ocean ecosystems. In a previous version of this video, we mistakenly compared the size of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch to the area of Australia. It is in fact roughly 1.6 million square kilometers, a little more than twice the size of the state of Texas. A huge area, but not nearly as big as Australia. Source: 🤍 For anyone interested in participating in the Ocean Conservancy's annual beach clean-up events, here is the link with information: 🤍 For more reading, check out this New Yorker article on the missing plastic problem, which inspired this video: 🤍 Laurent Lebreton’s research that estimates the amount of debris in the garbage patches is here: 🤍 For more about Ocean Conservancy’s work, and their annual international beach cleanup events: 🤍 For more reading about Erik Van Sebille’s work: 🤍 For more reading about Melanie Bergmann’s work: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Or Twitter: 🤍

How wide dynamic range makes dialogue harder to hear #shorts

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It’s not just you — dialogue is harder to hear these days. Vox producer Ed Vega explains just one of the reasons why. There's more to the story though. You can watch our full video on the topic here: 🤍 Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

Let’s talk about the parachuting beavers #shorts

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24.01.2023

So dropping beavers out of planes was a weird relocation method but it worked 75 out of 76 times and let’s just be glad we’ve found other ways to relocate our furry friends. The Idaho Fish and Game channel has the whole video on parachuting beavers, and you can watch it here: 🤍 Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

Two laws that make gun violence worse #shorts

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19.01.2023

We’re starting to learn which gun regulations work, and which ones might be making things worse. Joss Fong explains. Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

Behind the scenes with Vox #shorts

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What the camera sees versus what you see. Filmed by Cath Spangler. Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 This was a studio shoot for our World Cup coverage where we covered everything from FIFA's corruption to penalty kicks. Check out the playlist here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

How the Merchant of Death got his nickname

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How did Viktor Bout become the Merchant of Death? By swooping in and taking advantage of the post-Soviet chaos of the early 1990s. #viktorbout #britneygriner Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

The real reason Boeing's new plane crashed twice

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This isn’t just a computer bug. It’s a scandal. Join the Video Lab! 🤍 Two Boeing airplanes have fallen out of the air and crashed in the past six months. On the surface, this is a technical failure. But the real story is about a company's desire to beat their rival. Read about Boeing's efforts to get the 737 Max reinstated for flight here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍. Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Or Twitter: 🤍

Which way do you hear this audio illusion? #shorts

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Which way do you hear it? Noam Hassenfeld explains the tritone auditory illusion. Let us know in the comments! Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

The boxing film that was banned around the world

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24.02.2021

In 1910, boxing heavyweight champion Jack Johnson defeated Jim Jeffries in the "Battle of the Century," and the nation erupted. Subscribe to Vox and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 On December 26, 1908, American boxer Jack Johnson became the first Black heavyweight champion of the world, after defeating defending champion Tommy Burns in a title fight in Sydney, Australia. Black fighters were typically denied the chance to win the heavyweight title, a de-facto line of segregation that was known as “the color line.” So when Burns accepted Johnson’s challenge and lost, the film that was distributed around the fight proved controversial. The white boxing world set out to find a white heavyweight to beat Johnson and take back the title. That white fighter ended up being James Jeffries, a former heavyweight champion who had retired undefeated. Their fight, hyped as the “Battle of the Century,” took place in Reno, Nevada, on July 4, 1910, in front of 20,000 mostly-white spectators and nine motion picture cameras. Throughout the nation, many thousands more listened to live telegram bulletins of each round. Johnson beat Jeffries easily, and, as a result, racist mob violence broke out across the country, and Black Americans celebrating Johnson’s win were attacked, and some were killed. The film of the fight became notorious worldwide and was the most talked-about motion picture of its time. Johnson lost the heavyweight title in 1915 after successfully defending it eight times, but remained an inspiration for many fighters to come. Further reading: Fight Pictures: A History of Boxing and Early Cinema, by Dan Streible 🤍 Prizefighting and the Birth of Movie Censorship, by Barak Orbach 🤍 Jack Johnson, Rebel Sojourner: Boxing in the Shadow of the Global Color Line, by Theresa Runstedtler 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍​. Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Or Twitter: 🤍

How humans disrupted a cycle essential to all life

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How one animal dug up carbon and put it back into the atmosphere at an astounding pace. Become a member of the Vox Video Lab! 🤍 Subscribe to our channel! 🤍 Carbon cycles through earth at a steady pace. Plants and microorganisms absorb carbon, which helps them grow. Animals and bacteria eat the plants, breathe out carbon into the atmosphere, and take some carbon underground when they die. And a similar process happens in the ocean. It's nearly a closed loop, although some plants and animals don't decay fast enough so they turn into fossil fuel, which traps the carbon underground. But one animal started to dig up that carbon — and burn it. For more in-depth reading, check out these articles: 🤍 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍. Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Or Twitter: 🤍

Vox.com | Ezra Klein | Talks at Google

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Ezra Klein, Editor in-Chief for Vox.com, comes to Google to discuss the intersection of technology and news. If news stories were re-invented today, what would they look like? How would technology help facilitate the creation and distribution of stories? Prior to Vox, Klein managed a branded blog called "Wonkblog" at The Washington Post, which was The Post's most read blog in 2011. In 2011, he was named one of the 50 most powerful people in Washington, D.C., by GQ.

The US House Speaker drama, explained #shorts

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06.01.2023

Republicans can’t agree on a Speaker, and that has big implications for the next 2 years. Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

How America became a superpower

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23.11.2016

America grew from a colony to a superpower in 200 years. Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at 🤍 2:07 Correction: Cuba seceded from the US in 1902. With over 800 military bases around the globe, the US is easily the most powerful nation on earth. But it wasn't always this way. The US once played an insignificant role in global affairs. In this 8-minute video, you can see the transformation. Military budget data: 🤍 US foreign bases based on David Vine's book, "Base Nation" 🤍 Troop numbers: "Total Military Personnel and Dependent End Strength By Service, Regional Area, and Country". Defense Manpower Data Center. November 7, 2016. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Or on Facebook: 🤍

The surprising reason we call each other "guys" #shorts

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Hey guys, senior producer Coleman Lowndes here to explain. Source: “The Life of Guy” by Allan Metcalf Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

Why you can't compare Covid-19 vaccines

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What a vaccine's "efficacy rate" actually means. Sign up for our newsletter: 🤍 In the US, the first two available Covid-19 vaccines were the ones from Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna. Both vaccines have very high "efficacy rates," of around 95%. But the third vaccine introduced in the US, from Johnson & Johnson, has a considerably lower efficacy rate: just 66%. Look at those numbers next to each other, and it's natural to conclude that one of them is considerably worse. Why settle for 66% when you can have 95%? But that isn't the right way to understand a vaccine's efficacy rate, or even to understand what a vaccine does. And public health experts say that if you really want to know which vaccine is the best one, efficacy isn't actually the most important number at all. Further reading from Vox: Why comparing Covid-19 vaccine efficacy numbers can be misleading: 🤍 The vaccine metric that matters more than efficacy: 🤍 The limits of what vaccine efficacy numbers can tell us: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍. Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Or Twitter: 🤍

Why trees matter in a warming world

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Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

3 ways the 2022 election could go #shorts

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Story editor Adam Freelander summarizes. Want to watch more? Check out our longer take: 🤍 Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍

Those Who Walk Away | Legend of Vox Machina S2 Ep 4 Reaction

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PATREON📺: 🤍 Get 20% off your 🥤GFuel order using this link 🤍 use code 'YBR' CHECK OUT OUR MERCH 👕: 🤍 GAMING CHANNEL: 🤍 JOIN THE DISCORD! 🤍 FOLLOW ON INSTAGRAM 🤍 FOLLOW ON TWITTER 🤍 FOLLOW ON TIK TOK 🤍 Like my Facebook page 🤍 INTRO ANIMATION by Volta Bass 🤍 INTRO/OUTRO music by Plvyhaus 🤍 Subscribe to Lupasan 🤍 Subscribe to Sheera 🤍 Send Us Fan Mail Here: 5450 Bruce B Downs Blvd. # 403 Wesley Chapel, FL 33544 #YaBoyRoshi #legendofvoxmachina

Why all world maps are wrong

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Making accurate world maps is mathematically impossible. Follow Johnny on Instagram 🤍instagram.com/johnny.harris/ Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab: 🤍 Maps are flat representations of our spherical planet. Johnny Harris cut open a plastic globe to understand just what it takes to turn a sphere into something flat. His struggle to make a flat map out of the plastic globe is indicative of a challenge mapmakers have faced for centuries: It is mathematically impossible to translate the surface of a sphere onto a plane without some form of distortion. To solve this problem, mathematicians and cartographers have developed a huge library of representations of the globe, each distorting a certain attribute and preserving others. For instance, the Mercator projection preserves the shape of countries while distorting the size, especially near the north and south pole. For a more accurate view of land area look at the Gall-Peters projection, which preserves area while distorting shape. In the end, there's not "right" map projection. Each comes with trade-offs, and cartographers make projection decisions based on the particular tasks at hand. But if you are interested in seeing an accurate depiction of the planet, it's best to stick with a globe. Interact with projections: 🤍 Mercator tool: 🤍 Mike Bostock Map Transitions: 🤍 Mercator Puzzle: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Or on Facebook: 🤍

The fusion breakthrough, explained in 60 seconds

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Breaking down fusion in 60 seconds Subscribe to our channel! 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍. Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Or Twitter: 🤍

Are "yams" really sweet potatoes?

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Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

The 2026 World Cup has a huge math problem #shorts

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FIFA has decided the next World Cup finals will include 48 teams instead of 32. This expansion is being done for a variety of reasons, but it's created a big problem. It's unclear how to fairly divide up the teams in the group stage. Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

Disney's Bob CEO drama, in one chart #shorts

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It's pretty easy to understand the big Bob switch. Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

How Qatar built stadiums with forced labor

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And hurt thousands of migrant workers Subscribe and turn on notifications 🔔 so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Ever since Qatar won the rights to host the FIFA World Cup in 2010, its treatment of migrant workers has made international headlines. News stories and human rights organizations revealed migrant workers who built the stadiums, hotels, and all the new infrastructure required for the World Cup were being forced to work, not getting paid, unable to leave, and in some cases, dying. At the heart of the abuse faced by migrant workers is the kafala system. A system prevalent in Gulf states that ties workers to their sponsors, it often gives sponsors almost total control of migrant workers’ employment and immigration status. Due to all the scrutiny Qatar has been under, some reforms have been put in place, but the kafala system is more than a law — it’s a practice. And while these reforms exist on paper, human rights organizations say there’s still a long way to go. To understand how hundreds of thousands of migrant workers were stuck in an exploitative system while building the stadiums for the World Cup, watch our 10-minute video above. Further reading and sources: To dig deeper into the exploitation and discrimination migrant workers face, here’s Equidem’s detailed report: 🤍 And here’s another report by Amnesty International: 🤍 To understand the migrant experience, check out this infographic from Migrant Rights that walks you through the process that traps them: 🤍 Migrant Rights’ full report on Nepali migrant worker deaths can be found here: 🤍 To learn more about initiatives to compensate migrant workers, you can check out Amnesty International’s campaign here: 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

Why are three kids less common? Is it the car seats?

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By Phil Edwards Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

VOX AKUMA BEGINS DK COUNTRY 2 - I GENUINELY LOVE THESE GAMES NOW WTF【NIJISANJI EN | Vox Akuma】

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【StreamLabs Donations】 🤍 Thumbnail by 🤍 !! 【Hashtags】 General - #VoxAkuma LIVE - #VoxPopuLIVE Art - #Akurylic NSFW - #Akumasutra Memes - #AkumaMatata Fans - #Kindred GROUP: #Luxiem 【Credits】 Logo by 🤍 Overlay by 🤍 Controller by 🤍 Intro BGM - The Glory of Combat by Julian Surma Gaming chair by 🤍 Emotes by 🤍 ⚠️CHAT RULES⚠️ Simplified CN: 🤍 Traditional CN: 🤍 JP: 🤍 Welcome to the clan! We do things differently here so please read these rules carefully. These show not only how to behave on stream, but should serve as a guideline for if you wish to call yourself kindred. STREAM ETIQUETTE A. Please keep chat relevant to the stream and do not spam, troll or discuss controversial or offensive topics. B. Do not mention another streamer unless I bring them up first, nor should you mention me in any other chat unless I am mentioned first. C. All languages are welcome here, and you will be timed out if you ask people to stop talking in a certain language. D. Absolutely no spoilers or backseating unless directly asked for. E. Do not trauma dump in any way. If you use a supa to do so it will be deleted and I will ignore it. If you are struggling, please seek professional help or call someone, help is available, and you aren't alone; 🤍 F. Use emotes in chat as often as you like, but keep a limit of three per message. G. If you’d like to send supas, please use either your own currency, or, if you can’t, use one that is of similar value. Supas that misuse of another country's currency will be ignored, unless they are from Kindred who come from that country. RESPECT When engaging in other parts of the internet, respect those spaces and, if presenting as a kindred, do so with the politeness and kindness you would show other kindred. No matter how much you love being a kindred or love me, never use your passion for this community as an excuse to flame or attack others. If you do so, I do not want your support. You’re also welcome to ship me with anyone you like (with their permission of course) but please remember that your ship is only a fantasy and not to let it influence your world-view. RESPONSIBILITY You are welcome (even encouraged) to treat these streams as a source of warmth, happiness and community. If you associate these feelings with me and develop an attachment, that’s okay too. However, if you become too attached to the degree that it becomes unhealthy or parasocial, I trust you to seek help and to find happiness elsewhere. If you can do this, it will not offend me and I will be proud of you. You’re welcome back anytime as long as your engagement is done so with regards to your health. ACCOUNTABILITY Learn the difference between criticism and hate. Ignore hate, and if it’s in our chat, we’ll remove it. Honest criticism however is welcome and I trust all kindred to listen to criticism and assess it fairly. There is NEVER an excuse to bicker, fight or become defensive when someone wants to help. However, if you’d like to give criticism, please save it for YouTube comments after stream. ━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━ ━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━ ⏰【Luxiem】 【Vox Akuma ヴォックス・アクマ】 🤍 🤍 【Mysta Rias】 🤍 🤍 【Ike Eveland】 🤍 🤍 【Shu Yamino】 🤍 🤍 【Luca Kaneshiro】 🤍 🤍 ■ For more information, visit: ・ NIJISANJI Official YouTube (EN): 🤍 ・ NIJISANJI Official Twitch: 🤍 ・ NIJISANJI Official Twitter (English account): 🤍 ・ANYCOLOR Official Website: 🤍 ・ NIJISANJI Official Reddit: 🤍 ・ NIJISANJI Official Instagram: 🤍 ・ NIJISANJI Official Tiktok: 🤍 ・ NIJISANJI Official Facebook (English account): 🤍 ・ NIJISANJI Official YouTube (JP): 🤍 ▽ Guidance for minors 🤍 ▽ For Business and PR Inquiries 🤍

How did turkeys get so big #shorts

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By Jayne Quan and Kristen Williamson Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

How “Z” became Putin’s new propaganda meme

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The letter now signifies loyalty to the Russian president. Subscribe and turn on notifications 🔔 so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Russian gymnast Ivan Kuliak caused controversy in March 2022 when he accepted a bronze medal at a World Cup event, all while sporting a taped-on letter “Z” on his uniform. The Z symbol had already been appearing all over Russia, as a sign of support for the Russian invasion of Ukraine and loyalty to Russian President Vladimir Putin. The letter popped up on merchandise, in highly organized flash mobs that often involved children, at pro-war rallies, and in internet memes. The symbol was originally spotted on Russian tanks and trucks building up at Ukraine’s border in late February, along with other letters like V and O. Questions about what the symbols meant began circulating online, and once the invasion began on February 24, most analysts agreed the markings were likely for tactical purposes. But as intrigue around them grew, the Russian Defense Ministry seized on the opportunity to claim that the letters carry extra meaning. They began generating memes that incorporated the Z and V into propaganda slogans. Those letters don’t appear in Russia’s Cyrillic alphabet, so some of the memes Latinize them: most common are ones that begin with the word “for” — spelled “Зa” in Russian, but Latinized to “Za” for the memes. Another way Putin’s regime has turned Z into a propaganda meme has been by connecting it with the Soviet victory over Nazi Germany in World War II. The “Great Patriotic War” maintains a significant presence in Russian culture — the anniversary of Germany’s defeat is celebrated each year on May 9, or "Victory Day," and World War II imagery is heavily associated with Russian patriotism and national pride. Z memes that incorporate old photos of Soviet soldiers — and the recognizable orange and black stripes of the Ribbon of St. George — are an attempt to equate the current war in Ukraine with World War II. The Z has spread beyond Russia, too. It’s now seen in pro-Russian demonstrations worldwide and is banned in a growing list of countries. The Z’s evolution from tactical markings on invasion vehicles to a global pro-war symbol demonstrates the effectiveness of the Putin regime’s propaganda strategies. Correction: A previous version of this video showed a photo at 4:06 of graffiti in Vologograd which depicted a satirical use of "Z" slogans. We have changed the image to a graffitied "Z" in St. Petersburg instead. “Z” Is the Symbol of the New Russian Politics of Aggression, by Masha Gessen: 🤍 ‘Z’ How Russia transformed a letter of the Latin alphabet into the official (and ominous) symbol of its invasion of Ukraine, by Alexey Kovalev and Meduza: 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

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