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How Qatar built stadiums with forced labor

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01.12.2022

And hurt thousands of migrant workers Subscribe and turn on notifications 🔔 so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Ever since Qatar won the rights to host the FIFA World Cup in 2010, its treatment of migrant workers has made international headlines. News stories and human rights organizations revealed migrant workers who built the stadiums, hotels, and all the new infrastructure required for the World Cup were being forced to work, not getting paid, unable to leave, and in some cases, dying. At the heart of the abuse faced by migrant workers is the kafala system. A system prevalent in Gulf states that ties workers to their sponsors, it often gives sponsors almost total control of migrant workers’ employment and immigration status. Due to all the scrutiny Qatar has been under, some reforms have been put in place, but the kafala system is more than a law — it’s a practice. And while these reforms exist on paper, human rights organizations say there’s still a long way to go. To understand how hundreds of thousands of migrant workers were stuck in an exploitative system while building the stadiums for the World Cup, watch our 10-minute video above. Further reading and sources: To dig deeper into the exploitation and discrimination migrant workers face, here’s Equidem’s detailed report: 🤍 And here’s another report by Amnesty International: 🤍 To understand the migrant experience, check out this infographic from Migrant Rights that walks you through the process that traps them: 🤍 Migrant Rights’ full report on Nepali migrant worker deaths can be found here: 🤍 To learn more about initiatives to compensate migrant workers, you can check out Amnesty International’s campaign here: 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

Why trees matter in a warming world

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28.11.2022

Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

Why shipping container homes are overrated

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15.06.2022

They’re fun. They’re also way more difficult to build than they seem. Subscribe and turn on notifications 🔔 so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Shipping container homes have been a trend for a while, from reality TV shows to housing policy discussions. But the truth is that these homes are a lot more difficult to build than you might think. It’s easy to think that housing solutions are purely technological, but many obstacles to housing aren’t in construction but in the policies surrounding homebuilding. Moreover, many of the supposed advantages of shipping containers turn out to be more complicated in reality. Vox’s Phil Edwards spent a night in a shipping container home to see how the experience of staying in a shipping container compares with the reality of building one. Further Reading: Mark Hogan’s 2015 opinion piece about shipping containers is a great introduction to the topic: 🤍 Belinda Carr’s debunking of shipping containers gets into more building science detail: 🤍 She’s also an even-handed critic and made a video about five shipping container successes: 🤍 You can check out Michael’s Airbnbs here: 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind-the-scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

How the World Cup’s AI instant replay works

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29.11.2022

A new hyper-accurate technology, and referees' eternal quest for objectivity. Subscribe and turn on notifications 🔔 so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 The offside rule, which requires attacking players to be behind either the ball or the last defender, is a rule that sounds objective, but has led to a lot of questionable calls, partly because it can only be judged from an individual perspective. Until now. Meet the new “semi-automated AI offsides technology” at the 2022 World Cup. This technology relies on a sensor in the ball that relays its position on the field 500 times a second, and 12 motion tracking cameras mounted underneath the roof of the stadium that use machine learning to track 29 points in players’ bodies. In other words, FIFA is mo-capping players, just without the funny gray suits. And the whole system will alert referees when a player is offside. If you’ve been watching the World Cup, you may have also seen the motion tracking information being used to create an immediate 3D replay. This system seems like it could be capable of eliminating “bad” offside calls, or maybe bad calls altogether - but its new precision will inevitably impact gameplay no matter what. And the first World Cup to feature it will show us exactly how. Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

How “Z” became Putin’s new propaganda meme

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21.04.2022

The letter now signifies loyalty to the Russian president. Subscribe and turn on notifications 🔔 so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Russian gymnast Ivan Kuliak caused controversy in March 2022 when he accepted a bronze medal at a World Cup event, all while sporting a taped-on letter “Z” on his uniform. The Z symbol had already been appearing all over Russia, as a sign of support for the Russian invasion of Ukraine and loyalty to Russian President Vladimir Putin. The letter popped up on merchandise, in highly organized flash mobs that often involved children, at pro-war rallies, and in internet memes. The symbol was originally spotted on Russian tanks and trucks building up at Ukraine’s border in late February, along with other letters like V and O. Questions about what the symbols meant began circulating online, and once the invasion began on February 24, most analysts agreed the markings were likely for tactical purposes. But as intrigue around them grew, the Russian Defense Ministry seized on the opportunity to claim that the letters carry extra meaning. They began generating memes that incorporated the Z and V into propaganda slogans. Those letters don’t appear in Russia’s Cyrillic alphabet, so some of the memes Latinize them: most common are ones that begin with the word “for” — spelled “Зa” in Russian, but Latinized to “Za” for the memes. Another way Putin’s regime has turned Z into a propaganda meme has been by connecting it with the Soviet victory over Nazi Germany in World War II. The “Great Patriotic War” maintains a significant presence in Russian culture — the anniversary of Germany’s defeat is celebrated each year on May 9, or "Victory Day," and World War II imagery is heavily associated with Russian patriotism and national pride. Z memes that incorporate old photos of Soviet soldiers — and the recognizable orange and black stripes of the Ribbon of St. George — are an attempt to equate the current war in Ukraine with World War II. The Z has spread beyond Russia, too. It’s now seen in pro-Russian demonstrations worldwide and is banned in a growing list of countries. The Z’s evolution from tactical markings on invasion vehicles to a global pro-war symbol demonstrates the effectiveness of the Putin regime’s propaganda strategies. Correction: A previous version of this video showed a photo at 4:06 of graffiti in Vologograd which depicted a satirical use of "Z" slogans. We have changed the image to a graffitied "Z" in St. Petersburg instead. “Z” Is the Symbol of the New Russian Politics of Aggression, by Masha Gessen: 🤍 ‘Z’ How Russia transformed a letter of the Latin alphabet into the official (and ominous) symbol of its invasion of Ukraine, by Alexey Kovalev and Meduza: 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

The World Cup controversy around Iran’s flag, explained #shorts

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29.11.2022

By Coleman Lowndes Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

The real reason Egypt is moving its capital

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07.09.2022

Cairo isn’t the problem. Subscribe and turn on notifications 🔔 so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 In 2017, Egypt’s government announced it would build a new capital city 45 kilometers outside of Cairo, the current capital. It was a shocking announcement since Cairo, a city of more than 10,000,000 people, has been the capital of Egypt for decades. The government claims that Cairo has become too overcrowded and that moving the capital will give both Cairo’s residents and government workers more space. But this excuse is not new. For decades, Egypt’s rulers have been building brand new cities in the desert. None of them have solved Cairo’s density issue. And based on how construction is going, this new capital won’t be a solution either. So why does Egypt want a new capital? Well, it has a lot to do with the political revolution in 2011. Watch this episode of Vox Atlas to understand the real reason behind Egypt’s giant new capital city. Sources: Mohamed Elshahed’s extensive expertise on architectural history and urbanism helped us understand why creating new cities and communities doesn’t actually improve livelihoods in Cairo: Nasr City was once Egypt’s new capital, but things went wrong: 🤍 Revolutionary Modernism? Architecture and the Politics of Transition in Egypt 1936-1967: 🤍 For historical maps of Cairo, we mainly relied on these three books: Understanding Cairo: The Logic of a City Out of Control by David Sims 🤍 Egypt’s Desert Dreams: Development or Disaster by David Sims 🤍 Cairo by André Raymond 🤍 We used this report by LSE cities to compare densities between major cities at 1:52: 🤍 For the map at 5:05, we used an updated informal cities map created by Ahmed Zaazaa, a researcher and urban designer. For the demolitions and displacement locations, we used press clippings from Egypt Today and maps from the Cairo 2050 plan. Not all locations are shown. 🤍 🤍 These three links helped us create the diagram at 6:42 that shows the population target gaps in Greater Cairo’s new cities: The Built Environment Observatory: 🤍 City Population: 🤍 Egypt census data: 🤍 These two pieces helped guide the direction of our video: The Sinister Side of Sisi’s Urban Development by Maged Mandour 🤍 Why is Egypt building a new capital by Mustafa Menshaway 🤍 And a special thanks to the many others based in Cairo who helped us research for this video. Unfortunately, their names could not be listed due to safety concerns. Make sure you never miss behind-the-scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

Brazil’s Lula da Silva, explained

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25.10.2022

Lula da Silva wants to be president for a second time. But Brazil has changed. Subscribe and turn on notifications 🔔 so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 On October 2, 2022, Brazilians voted in the first round of their presidential election. The top two finishers were current president Jair Bolsonaro and former president Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva. Both candidates will face each other in a run-off on October 30. Lula is considered likely to win. Lula is arguably Brazil’s most well-known and complex politician. He helped form a powerful political party, had two successful terms in office, and even served jail time over corruption and bribery allegations. After four years of Bolsonaro’s presidency, the core of Lula’s campaign has focused on restoring the Brazil of his own presidency. But a lot has changed in Brazil since his time in office. Watch this video for a glance at Lula’s career and to understand why his second time as president would be very different than his first. Some sources that were helpful to us in researching this story: The Brazilian Report’s election coverage 🤍 Lula and His Politics of Cunning by John French 🤍 Nurturing Hope, Deepening Democracy, and Combating Inequalities in Brazil: Lula, the Workers' Party, and Dilma Rousseff's 2010 Election as President by John French and Alexandre Fortes 🤍 Lula’s Second Act by Giancarlo Summa 🤍 Can Brazil Turn Back the Clock by Brian Winter 🤍 How Bolsonaro Might Win-Even If He Loses by Brian Winter 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

Who made these circles in the Sahara?

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10.05.2022

Someone left these marks in the sand. We had to find out who. Subscribe and turn on notifications 🔔 so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Deep in the Sahara, far from any towns, roads, or other signs of life, is a row of markings in the sand. There are dozens of them stretching for miles in a straight line in central Algeria, each consisting of a central point surrounded by a circle of 12 nodes, like numbers on a clock. And when we started making this video, no one seemed to know what they were. We first saw the circles back in September 2021, after finding a Reddit post on r/WhatIsThis with coordinates asking what the circles could be. With just two upvotes and two commenters, it wasn’t exactly a lively discussion. But seeing the circles themselves on Google Earth was fascinating: They were eerily perfect in their shape and regularity, but so deeply isolated in the desert. We were hooked on finding an answer. So we decided to make a video out of trying to solve the mystery, no matter where it took us. We documented every step of the process — from Zoom calls and web browser screen recordings to vlogs and field shoots — to show the reporting process from the inside out. And when we maxed out what we could learn on the internet, we handed over this story to a team in Algeria to take it all the way. Resources: Check out the circles for yourself: 🤍 Read Will K’s original post: 🤍 Here’s the 1885 document that Melissa found: 🤍 Read Dale Lightfoot on the sustainability of qanats: 🤍 My interview with Marta Musso didn’t make the final cut, but you can check out her work on the history of the hydrocarbon industry and Algerian decolonization: 🤍 I also spoke to Roberto Cantoni, who wrote a great book that covers the same history: 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

The world's biggest wave, explained

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13.05.2022

And how it's transformed a Portuguese town. Subscribe and turn on notifications 🔔 so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Nazaré, Portugal was for centuries just a small fishing village known for its fishermen and dangerous seas. Then one day in 2011, a pro-surfer named Garrett McNamara strapped on a surf board and rode a 78 foot wave right off its coast. It was a new world-record for big wave surfing and the moment that changed Nazaré forever. Now, Nazaré is the capital of Big Wave surfing. The secret to Nazaré’s giant waves lies under the surface, where a huge underwater canyon funnels swells right up to its cliffs, then launches that energy straight up, sometimes 60, 70, or 80 feet. Many surfers visit in the hopes of catching a 100-foot wave. Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

Why are three kids less common? Is it the car seats?

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21.11.2022

By Phil Edwards Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

Humans finally figured out how to make it rain

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03.08.2022

Cloud seeding, explained. We flew up to see it with our own eyes. Subscribe and turn on notifications 🔔 so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 For decades, drought-stricken areas around the world have practiced “cloud seeding,” a process where chemical flares full of silver iodide are shot into clouds to encourage them to rain. But until recently, the science didn’t quite back this practice up. In large part, that’s because operational cloud seeding programs don’t have the luxury of conducting controlled tests — they have an obligation to produce as much rain as possible for the people living under the clouds they seed. But there’s been a new breakthrough. In 2017, a major cloud seeding experiment in the mountains of Idaho showed that cloud seeding works; shooting chemical flares into the sky does produce more precipitation. As the world faces an increasing number of heat waves and droughts, banking water is becoming more and more important. And while we don’t know exactly how life-changing cloud seeding will turn out to be, we do know it has the potential to be a tool in our arsenal in the long battle against worsening droughts. To understand how cloud seeding works and what it’s already doing in Texas, watch this video and take a trip up to the clouds to see it yourself. The Future Perfect team at Vox explores big problems and the big ideas that can tackle them. Read more here: 🤍 This video was made possible by a grant from the BEMC Foundation. Sources and further reading: To get a deeper understanding of droughts in all their complexity, how they interact with the water cycle, and how climate change makes them worse, check out NRDC’s guide: 🤍 To understand how tree-ring data and modern data are combined to get a better understanding of droughts over the last thousand years, check out this report: 🤍 To keep track of the many, severe droughts across the US, you can use the US Drought Monitor: 🤍 To read about Texas’s state climate summary for 2022, click on this link: 🤍 To explore how Texas temperatures have changed over time, check out NOAA’s data here: 🤍 You can check out the results of the game-changing experiment that verified cloud seeding works here: 🤍 To read more about the United Nation’s predictions for droughts and water shortages, check out their report here: 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind-the-scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: vox.com/store Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

World Cup penalty kicks, tracked

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24.11.2022

If you watch hundreds of kicks, it’s possible to make some conclusions. Subscribe and turn on notifications 🔔 so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 A World Cup penalty kick shootout can be one of the tensest ways to end a match. But where’s the best spot to place a kick? Data scientist Pablo López Landeros pored over hundreds of kicks and tracked where keepers dove, where players kicked the ball and, most importantly, when they scored a goal. As the above video shows, the results provided some conclusions — and also raised some questions about the best spot for a penalty kick. Further Reading: 🤍 Check out Pablo’s dataset above, as well as some of the visualizations built off of it. 🤍 Histories of the Panenka kick, like the above, are a good way to waste the afternoon. Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

Why scientists started dropping cats in the 1800s #shorts

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21.11.2022

By Coleman Lowndes Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

How the “lost cities” of the Amazon were finally found

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07.07.2022

And why they were so hard to see Subscribe and turn on notifications 🔔 so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 The Amazon has always been one of the most mysterious places on earth. When European colonizers arrived in the 16th century, they were captivated by rumors of a golden city, hidden somewhere in the rainforest. Their search for “El Dorado” lasted more than a century, but only resulted in disaster, death, and further conquest of the indigenous people there. Experts thereafter looked at the Amazon and saw only a desolate jungle; too harsh for extensive agriculture and therefore sparsely populated. They believed that it had always been this way. Until recently. Beginning in the late 20th century, archaeologists began looking more closely at the forest floor. Working with the indigenous people who still remained there, they excavated long ditches and mounds. After mapping them, they could see that these were the markings of large settlements; walls, moats, plazas, and roads that connected even more settlements. And they were all over the Amazon. Further reading: The Lost City of Z, David Grann Exploration Fawcett: Journey to the Lost City of Z, Percy Fawcett The works of Michael Heckenberger; 🤍 Lidar reveals pre-Hispanic low-density urbanism in the Bolivian Amazon 🤍 The geoglyph sites of Acre, Brazil: 10 000-year-old land-use practices and climate change in Amazonia 🤍 Predicting pre-Columbian anthropogenic soils in Amazonia 🤍 The Lore of Lost Cities - Imagining The Lost City Of Z 🤍 Once Hidden by Forest, Carvings in Land Attest to Amazon’s Lost World 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

Behind the scenes with Vox #shorts

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What the camera sees versus what you see. Filmed by Cath Spangler. Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 This was a studio shoot for our World Cup coverage where we covered everything from FIFA's corruption to penalty kicks. Check out the playlist here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

How your TV settings ruin movies

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31.08.2022

Your TV is ruining your TV. Make it stop. Subscribe and turn on notifications 🔔 so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Your TV finds lots of ways to adjust your picture. You might not want any of them. Motion smoothing, sharpening, brightness, contrast, and saturation are all adjustments that your television makes to your picture. These can differ wildly from what filmmakers intend and, sometimes, that’s a nightmare. As the above video shows, these adjustments are subtle but significant, especially when viewed alongside the original image. Fortunately, there is a solution — TV manufacturers have begun adopting new modes like “Filmmaker Mode,” which largely remove television tweaks to an image. Further reading: 🤍 You can learn more about what the UHD Alliance is and what it does here. 🤍 Filmmakers prefer you turn off TV tweaks, as in this PSA by Dune director Denis Villeneuve. 🤍 Once the 4K TV revolution began, cinematographer and director Reed Morano led the charge against TV tweaks using this petition on Change.org. Make sure you never miss behind-the-scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

Vox.com | Ezra Klein | Talks at Google

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27.01.2015

Ezra Klein, Editor in-Chief for Vox.com, comes to Google to discuss the intersection of technology and news. If news stories were re-invented today, what would they look like? How would technology help facilitate the creation and distribution of stories? Prior to Vox, Klein managed a branded blog called "Wonkblog" at The Washington Post, which was The Post's most read blog in 2011. In 2011, he was named one of the 50 most powerful people in Washington, D.C., by GQ.

The Middle East's cold war, explained

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17.07.2017

How two feuding countries are tearing apart the Middle East. Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab: 🤍 The Saudis and Iranians have never actually declared war on each other. Instead, they fight indirectly by supporting opposing sides in other countries and inciting conflicts. This is known as proxy warfare. And it’s had a devastating effect on the region. Countries, especially poor ones, can’t function if there are larger countries pulling strings within their borders. And that’s exactly what's happening in the Middle East. The Saudi-Iranian rivalry has become a fight over influence, and the whole region is a battlefield. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Or on Facebook: 🤍

Why all world maps are wrong

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02.12.2016

Making accurate world maps is mathematically impossible. Follow Johnny on Instagram 🤍instagram.com/johnny.harris/ Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab: 🤍 Maps are flat representations of our spherical planet. Johnny Harris cut open a plastic globe to understand just what it takes to turn a sphere into something flat. His struggle to make a flat map out of the plastic globe is indicative of a challenge mapmakers have faced for centuries: It is mathematically impossible to translate the surface of a sphere onto a plane without some form of distortion. To solve this problem, mathematicians and cartographers have developed a huge library of representations of the globe, each distorting a certain attribute and preserving others. For instance, the Mercator projection preserves the shape of countries while distorting the size, especially near the north and south pole. For a more accurate view of land area look at the Gall-Peters projection, which preserves area while distorting shape. In the end, there's not "right" map projection. Each comes with trade-offs, and cartographers make projection decisions based on the particular tasks at hand. But if you are interested in seeing an accurate depiction of the planet, it's best to stick with a globe. Interact with projections: 🤍 Mercator tool: 🤍 Mike Bostock Map Transitions: 🤍 Mercator Puzzle: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Or on Facebook: 🤍

Why Queen Elizabeth II was the queen of 15 countries

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24.09.2022

The Commonwealth, explained. Subscribe and turn on notifications 🔔 so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 After centuries of colonizing much of the world, the British Empire began its fast descent in the 1960s amid a global wave of independence movements. But when Queen Elizabeth II died in 2022, she was not only still queen of 14 countries besides the United Kingdom, she was also still the leader of an organization that on a map looks a lot like the British Empire. The British Empire created the first iteration of the Commonwealth to appease white settler colonies looking for more autonomy. It granted them more independence to govern themselves but kept them under the crown. As British leaders realized their power might be at risk throughout their colonies worldwide, the monarchy made a play to keep ties and preserve their global influence by allowing newly independent republics to join the Commonwealth too. The only catch: They had to accept the queen as the leader of the organization. With the death of Queen Elizabeth II, this vestige of the British Empire is now under the leadership of King Charles III. So, what exactly is the Commonwealth? Why is it still here? And will it survive? Correction: A previous version of this video mistakenly showed Myanmar as a member of the Commonwealth on a 1994 map, mislabeled Sierra Leone and Gold Coast for a brief moment on a 1927 map, and omitted Greenland, all of which have now been corrected. We have also clarified that India became a republic shortly after independence with a new line of narration at 3:12; corrected Queen Elizabeth II’s title at 00:16 and 00:47; and updated the date Barbados became a republic from November 29, 2021, to November 30, 2021. Sources: Read about Barbados shedding the queen and becoming a republic: 🤍 To learn more about the sugar plantations under the British Empire check out this project: 🤍 To understand 20th-century Britain and the rise of independence movements, check out “The Impact of the Second World War on the Decolonization of Africa”: 🤍 To take a deeper look at how the monarchy started using its image and the media to stay relevant and survive in a changing world, check out Ed Owens’ book: 🤍 To understand the role of the Commonwealth today, check out this op-ed by Philip Murray, director of the Institute of Commonwealth Studies: 🤍 For a deeper look at royalty in general and the British Royal family in particular, watch our episode of Royalty, Explained on Netflix: 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

Who's really using up the water in the American West?

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26.09.2022

Hint: water scarcity in the Western US has more to do with our diets than our lawns. Subscribe and turn on notifications 🔔 so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 The Western United States is currently battling the most severe drought in thousands of years. A mix of bad water management policies and manmade climate change has created a situation where water supplies in Western reservoirs are so low, states are being forced to cut their water use. It’s not hard to find media coverage that focuses on the excesses of residential water use: long showers, swimming pools, lawn watering, at-home car washes. Or in the business sector, like irrigating golf courses or pumping water into hotel fountains in Las Vegas. But when a team of researchers looked at water use in the West, they uncovered a very different story about where most Western water goes. Their findings may hold the solution to dwindling water supplies in the West. Check out the video above to learn more, and take a look at the study that this story is centered on: 🤍 Lead study author Brian Richter wrote this post on common misconceptions about water scarcity: 🤍 For Vox coverage on water management policies on the Colorado River, which we weren’t able to cover in this story: 🤍 For coverage on just how bad the current drought is: 🤍 For more coverage of the rotational fallowing program in the Palo Verde district in California: 🤍 Check out Our World in Data for data on meat and dairy production and consumption across the world: 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

How China uses fruit to punish Taiwan

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01.04.2022

It's not just about fruit. Subscribe and turn on notifications 🔔 so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 In September 2021, China banned the import of sugar apples, or atemoya, from Taiwan, claiming they were bringing in pests. Critics say pests are an excuse, and China is weaponizing trade with Taiwan. And this isn’t the first time. In February of 2021, China banned the import of Taiwanese pineapples, causing a backlog and threatening farmers' livelihoods across the country. The current situation is tied to a complex history that goes back to the Chinese civil war, and to recent tensions that go back to 2016, when Taiwan elected a new president. Since then, Chinese military incursions into Taiwan’s air space have been on the rise, and the relation between the two has kept deteriorating. Fruit is the latest expression of this. To understand how this atemoya ban impacts farmers in Taiwan, and how it all ties together, watch our video. Sources and further reading: You can check out the data on Taiwan’s fruit exports here: 🤍 To read more about the pineapple campaign and how it played out, check this out: 🤍 To read the Cross-Strait Agreement on Trade in Services, click here: 🤍 To understand the Sunflower Movement in more depth, read this: 🤍 For a deeper look at China’s military incursions, check this out: 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

Why Jakarta is sinking

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19.02.2021

The 400-year curse dragging Indonesia's capital into the sea. Subscribe to our channel! 🤍 Like many coastal cities around the world, Jakarta is dealing with sea level rise. But Indonesia's biggest city also has a unique problem: Because of restricted water access in the city, the majority of its residents have to extract groundwater to survive. And it's causing the city to sink. Today, Jakarta is the world’s fastest-sinking city. The problem gets worse every year, but the root of it precedes modern Indonesia by centuries. In the 1600s, when the Dutch landed in Indonesia and built present-day Jakarta, they divided up the city to segregate the population. Eventually, that segregation led to an unequal water piping system that excluded most Indigenous Jakartans, forcing them to find other ways to get water. To understand how it all ties together, and what’s in store for Jakarta’s future, watch the video above. Sources and further reading: If you want to learn more about the development of Jakarta’s urban water supply going all the way back to colonial times, check out Michelle Kooy’s detailed reports: 🤍 🤍 To understand Jakarta’s colonial history and the segregation that came of it, check out this article from the Journal of Historians of Netherlandish Art: 🤍 To read about the evolution of the canals the Dutch built in present-day Jakarta and how their deterioration impacted water access and segregation, here’s a study from Dr. Euis Puspita Dewi, who we feature in the video: 🤍 To get a broader look at the many other cities sinking in Indonesia, check out this article by Dr. Estelle Chaussard: 🤍 Thanks for watching and let us know what you think in the comments! Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍​. Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Or Twitter: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍. Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Or Twitter: 🤍

【UNRAVEL TWO w/ SHOTO】just like old times【NIJISANJI EN | Vox Akuma】

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【StreamLabs Donations】 🤍 Thumbnail by 🤍 !! 【Hashtags】 General - #VoxAkuma LIVE - #VoxPopuLIVE Art - #Akurylic NSFW - #Akumasutra Memes - #AkumaMatata Fans - #Kindred GROUP: #Luxiem 【Credits】 Logo by 🤍 Overlay by 🤍 Controller by 🤍 Intro BGM - The Glory of Combat by Julian Surma Gaming chair by 🤍 Emotes by 🤍 ⚠️CHAT RULES⚠️ Simplified CN: 🤍 Traditional CN: 🤍 JP: 🤍 Welcome to the clan! We do things differently here so please read these rules carefully. These show not only how to behave on stream, but should serve as a guideline for if you wish to call yourself kindred. STREAM ETIQUETTE A. Please keep chat relevant to the stream and do not spam, troll or discuss controversial or offensive topics. B. Do not mention another streamer unless I bring them up first, nor should you mention me in any other chat unless I am mentioned first. C. All languages are welcome here, and you will be timed out if you ask people to stop talking in a certain language. D. Absolutely no spoilers or backseating unless directly asked for. E. Do not trauma dump in any way. If you use a supa to do so it will be deleted and I will ignore it. If you are struggling, please seek professional help or call someone, help is available, and you aren't alone; 🤍 RESPECT When engaging in other parts of the internet, respect those spaces and, if presenting as a kindred, do so with the politeness and kindness you would show other kindred. No matter how much you love being a kindred or love me, never use your passion for this community as an excuse to flame or attack others. If you do so, I do not want your support. You’re also welcome to ship me with anyone you like (with their permission of course) but please remember that your ship is only a fantasy and not to let it influence your world-view. RESPONSIBILITY You are welcome (even encouraged) to treat these streams as a source of warmth, happiness and community. If you associate these feelings with me and develop an attachment, that’s okay too. However, if you become too attached to the degree that it becomes unhealthy or parasocial, I trust you to seek help and to find happiness elsewhere. If you can do this, it will not offend me and I will be proud of you. You’re welcome back anytime as long as your engagement is done so with regards to your health. ACCOUNTABILITY Learn the difference between criticism and hate. Ignore hate, and if it’s in our chat, we’ll remove it. Honest criticism however is welcome and I trust all kindred to listen to criticism and assess it fairly. There is NEVER an excuse to bicker, fight or become defensive when someone wants to help. However, if you’d like to give criticism, please save it for YouTube comments after stream. ━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━ ━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━ ⏰【Luxiem】 【Vox Akuma ヴォックス・アクマ】 🤍 🤍 【Mysta Rias】 🤍 🤍 【Ike Eveland】 🤍 🤍 【Shu Yamino】 🤍 🤍 【Luca Kaneshiro】 🤍 🤍 ■ For more information, visit: ・ NIJISANJI Official YouTube (EN): 🤍 ・ NIJISANJI Official Twitch: 🤍 ・ NIJISANJI Official Twitter (English account): 🤍 ・ANYCOLOR Official Website: 🤍 ・ NIJISANJI Official Reddit: 🤍 ・ NIJISANJI Official Instagram: 🤍 ・ NIJISANJI Official Tiktok: 🤍 ・ NIJISANJI Official Facebook (English account): 🤍 ・ NIJISANJI Official YouTube (JP): 🤍 ▽ Guidance for minors 🤍 ▽ For Business and PR Inquiries 🤍

Are "yams" really sweet potatoes?

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22.11.2022

Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

Why 99% of ocean plastic pollution is "missing"

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27.04.2021

The plastic we dump into the ocean might be hiding in plain sight. Subscribe to our channel! 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍. For the past several years scientists have been trying to account for the 8 million metric tonnes of plastic that we dump into the ocean each year. The assumption was that a large portion of it was floating out in one of the large garbage patches, where swirling debris accumulates thanks to ocean gyres. But recent measurements of the amount of trash in the patches fell far short of what’s thought to be out there. Scientists are getting closer to an answer, which could help clean-up efforts and prevent further damage to marine life and ocean ecosystems. In a previous version of this video, we mistakenly compared the size of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch to the area of Australia. It is in fact roughly 1.6 million square kilometers, a little more than twice the size of the state of Texas. A huge area, but not nearly as big as Australia. Source: 🤍 For anyone interested in participating in the Ocean Conservancy's annual beach clean-up events, here is the link with information: 🤍 For more reading, check out this New Yorker article on the missing plastic problem, which inspired this video: 🤍 Laurent Lebreton’s research that estimates the amount of debris in the garbage patches is here: 🤍 For more about Ocean Conservancy’s work, and their annual international beach cleanup events: 🤍 For more reading about Erik Van Sebille’s work: 🤍 For more reading about Melanie Bergmann’s work: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Or Twitter: 🤍

The real reason Boeing's new plane crashed twice

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15.04.2019

This isn’t just a computer bug. It’s a scandal. Join the Video Lab! 🤍 Two Boeing airplanes have fallen out of the air and crashed in the past six months. On the surface, this is a technical failure. But the real story is about a company's desire to beat their rival. Read about Boeing's efforts to get the 737 Max reinstated for flight here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍. Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Or Twitter: 🤍

The 116 images NASA wants aliens to see

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11.11.2015

Here are all the photos flying through interstellar space on Voyager's Golden Record. 🤍 Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at 🤍 Sources: 🤍 🤍 🤍 When Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 launched into space in 1977, their mission was to explore the outer solar system, and over the following decade, they did so admirably. With an 8-track tape memory system and onboard computers that are thousands of times weaker than the phone in your pocket, the two spacecraft sent back an immense amount of imagery and information about the four gas giants, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. But NASA knew that after the planetary tour was complete, the Voyagers would remain on a trajectory toward interstellar space, having gained enough velocity from Jupiter's gravity to eventually escape the grasp of the sun. Since they will orbit the Milky Way for the foreseeable future, the Voyagers should carry a message from their maker, NASA scientists decided. The Voyager team tapped famous astronomer and science popularizer Carl Sagan to compose that message. Sagan's committee chose a copper phonograph LP as their medium, and over the course of six weeks they produced the "Golden Record": a collection of sounds and images that will probably outlast all human artifacts on Earth. /// Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

How America became a superpower

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23.11.2016

America grew from a colony to a superpower in 200 years. Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at 🤍 2:07 Correction: Cuba seceded from the US in 1902. With over 800 military bases around the globe, the US is easily the most powerful nation on earth. But it wasn't always this way. The US once played an insignificant role in global affairs. In this 8-minute video, you can see the transformation. Military budget data: 🤍 US foreign bases based on David Vine's book, "Base Nation" 🤍 Troop numbers: "Total Military Personnel and Dependent End Strength By Service, Regional Area, and Country". Defense Manpower Data Center. November 7, 2016. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Or on Facebook: 🤍

Putin's war on Ukraine, explained

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02.03.2022

Ukraine is under attack. Follow Vox for the latest: 🤍 Subscribe and turn on notifications 🔔 so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 On February 24th, Russia launched a military invasion of Ukraine. Russian President Vladimir Putin called it a “special military operation,” but the scale of the attack shows this is a full-scale war that has already caused more than 100 casualties and forced more than half a million Ukrainians to flee their homes. Ukraine and Russia’s conflict goes back to 2014, when Russia invaded and annexed Crimea and Russian-backed separatist forces took over parts of southeastern Ukraine’s Donbas region. But to understand the full context behind the invasion, it’s important to go even farther back, to the time when Europe’s current-day divisions began, and see how that shaped Europe’s power balance today. To understand the current conflict’s history in less than 10 minutes, watch the video above. Further reading: For the latest on the 2022 Russian invasion of Ukraine, read more from Vox: 🤍 Or listen to our podcasts that cover the history of the situation, pull in expert voices, and more: 🤍 For more information on the human impact this war is having on the ground, check out Human Rights Watch: 🤍 For the UN’s latest information on the displacement of Ukrainians click here: 🤍 For the latest on the situation on the ground you can check out the daily updates from the Institute for the Study of War: 🤍 And the International Crisis Group: 🤍 For a detailed look at Ukraine’s decision to pull out from the 2013 EU agreement, check this out: 🤍 To better understand the annexation of Crimea and what that meant for Ukraine, click here: 🤍 To understand Putin’s grip on power, we recommend this book: 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

Why so many "election deniers" lost in 2022

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18.11.2022

The everyday people who beat back the assault on democracy (for now). Send us your questions! 🤍 The belief that Donald Trump actually won the 2020 US election is widespread among his most devoted followers. That belief rests on claims of massive voter fraud in the 2020 election that have never been substantiated. And in the 2022 elections, many “election deniers” ran for state-level offices that have direct control over elections, promising to limit access to voting if they won. Of all Republican nominees for election-administration positions this year, over half openly claimed that Trump won in 2020. But when the election came, the most high-profile of those “election denier” nominees, many of whom were favored to win, actually lost. And the story of why many of them lost is actually the story of thousands of ordinary citizens using the tools of democracy to protect democracy. Have you always wanted to be in a Vox video? If you have a question about the news that keeps you up at night or confuses you, share it with us! We’re excited to make a whole series of videos answering questions directly from you. Let’s get some answers: 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

How Ukraine got the upper hand against Russia

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16.09.2022

Ukraine’s breakthrough counterattack, explained. Subscribe and turn on notifications 🔔 so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 In the spring and summer of 2022, the war between Ukraine and Russia settled into a stalemate. The first phase of the war had been a rapid invasion that drew new battle lines across Ukraine; this next phase saw those battle lines harden and change very little over a long period of fighting. But in September, that chapter came to an end. For the first time in several months, Ukraine scored a major victory and won back significant territory from Russia. Ukraine pulled this victory off by taking advantage of a surprising weakness in the Russian army: the difficulty it’s had maintaining its ranks of skilled soldiers, especially compared to the training and resources that Ukraine’s army has received from its allies. Reports suggest that Russia’s army has suffered catastrophic losses in the war, and that it’s attempted to replace those more highly trained forces with large numbers of mercenaries, prisoners, and men over 40. It’s an army that was stretched thin and vulnerable to the multi-pronged attack Ukraine launched in September. Russia still controls a large amount of territory in southern Ukraine, including two major cities. But Ukraine’s victory outside of Kharkiv signals a new chapter in the war — one where, remarkably, Ukraine seems to have a shot at driving out the Russians completely. Watch the video to learn more about why this attack worked and why it matters so much. Some sources we drew on for the video: For day-by-day updates and maps on the Russian invasion of Ukraine we relied heavily on the Institute for the Study of War’s Ukraine Project: 🤍 We also found this interactive map by Neue Zürcher Zeitung very helpful: 🤍 And this tracker from the New York Times helped us understand how the offensive started: 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

Batteries are dirty. Geothermal power can help.

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A better future can’t just be green, it must also be fair. Subscribe and turn on notifications 🔔 so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Lithium-ion batteries are a transformative technology in the fight against climate change. Most notably, they power electric vehicles, which have the potential to replace emissions produced by road transportation. But there’s a problem. These batteries require nickel. And in Indonesia, where the majority of nickel is produced, the production process emits large amounts of carbon and pollution. It’s impacting the people who live by the production centers, who are registering an increase in respiratory illnesses. The US is essentially outsourcing carbon emissions and pollution in exchange for green energy. It doesn’t have to be this way. Indonesia sits along the Ring of Fire, one of the most geologically active regions in the world, making it an ideal place to produce geothermal energy. Geothermal energy taps into the heat beneath the ground mostly found in volcanic regions. To use the heat beneath the earth’s surface, we need to drill into the ground, draw up the hot water, and use it to turn turbines that produce electricity. After, the water is funneled back underground, making geothermal a mostly clean and renewable energy source. While the exploration and development process of geothermal energy can be expensive, Indonesia already has more than 30 active geothermal facilities. As the world’s need for lithium-ion batteries increases, Indonesia and the companies invested in the region have the opportunity to make their processes greener from start to finish — and protect the people that live next to nickel production centers. To understand the repercussions of nickel production in Indonesia and how geothermal energy could help fix the air pollution and emissions it produces, watch our video. The Future Perfect team at Vox explores big problems and the big ideas that can tackle them. Read more here: 🤍 This video was made possible by a grant from the BEMC Foundation. Watch previous episodes of Future Perfect here: 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind-the-scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

How did turkeys get so big #shorts

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24.11.2022

By Jayne Quan and Kristen Williamson Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

We tracked what happens after TikTok songs go viral

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31.05.2022

A data investigation into how TikTok is shaping the music industry, in collaboration with The Pudding. Subscribe and turn on notifications 🔔 so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 It’s no secret that TikTok is a virality machine. Songs get turned into sounds that can be used in any video, and if they gain enough traction they can catapult a musician into the pop culture stratosphere. But we wanted to know exactly what happens between a song going viral and an artist becoming a bonafide success. So in the fall of 2021, we partnered with data analysis website The Pudding figure it out. Along the way, we discovered that using data to concretely answer this question is quite a challenge. Our process included creating dozens of custom data sets, careful fact-checking, and conversations with both hit songwriters and music industry executives to match data with real experiences. After seven months of spreadsheets, data deep-dives, and interviews, we were able to follow the numbers to track what happens to artists after they go viral — and how the music industry has shapeshifted around TikTok. It turns out the app is completely revolutionizing the way record labels work, and giving artists more leverage than ever. Check out the data on The Pudding's website here: 🤍 More from The Pudding: 🤍 | TikTok: 🤍the_pudding Additional credit: Researcher Halley Brown You can find all of our interviewees at the links below: JVKE | TikTok: 🤍JVKE | IG: 🤍itsjvke L.Dre | TikTok: 🤍ldrethegiant | IG: 🤍ldrethegiant | YouTube: 🤍youtube.com/ProdByLDre Tom Rosenthal | TikTok: 🤍tomrosenthalmusic Mary Rahmani | 🤍moonprojects.com Ari Herstand | aristake.com Elias Leight | Twitter: 🤍ehleight Matt Daniels | Twitter: 🤍matthew_daniels Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

The Israel-Palestine conflict: a brief, simple history

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20.01.2016

The conflict is really only 100 years old. Subscribe to our channel! 🤍 One of the biggest myths about the Israel-Palestine conflict is that it's been going on for centuries, that this is all about ancient religious hatreds. In fact, while religion is involved, the conflict is mostly about two groups of people who claim the same land. And it really only goes back about a century, to the early 1900s. At its heart, it is a conflict between two self-determination movements — the Jewish Zionist project and the Palestinian nationalist project — that lay claim to the same territory. Read more about the Israel-Palestine conflict on Vox: 🤍 Your basic questions about Israel and Palestine answered: – What are Israel and Palestine? Why are they fighting? 🤍 – What is Zionism? 🤍 – How did Israel become a country in the first place? 🤍 – What are settlements, and why are they such a big deal? 🤍 – What were the intifadas? 🤍 – How does the world feel about Israel/Palestine? 🤍 – What is the Israeli-Palestinian peace process? 🤍 Further reading on the Israel-Palestine conflict: 🤍 You can also watch our three-part documentary series on Israeli settlements from 2016. Start with part 1 here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Or on Facebook: 🤍

The Armenia and Azerbaijan war, explained

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00:09:26
03.12.2020

And where it leaves war-torn Nagorno-Karabakh. Subscribe to our channel! 🤍 Nagorno-Karabakh is a mountainous area in the Caucasus region between Europe and Asia. For more than 30 years, it's been locked in a conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan. The fight between the two countries began in the early 20th century but became a frozen conflict for 60 years while the whole region was under the control of the Soviet Union. When the Soviet Union fell, newfound independence sparked a brutal six-year war in the region, where Armenia emerged victorious. From 1994 to 2020, Armenia controlled Nagorno-Karabakh, while Azerbaijan rebuilt its military. Fighting erupted again in summer 2020, and Azerbaijan went on the offensive — eventually capturing most of Nagorno-Karabakh and dramatically reshaping the region. Sources and further reading: Thomas de Waal: 🤍 Alex Ward, Vox: 🤍 Charlotte Mathilde Louise Hille: 🤍 Human Rights Watch: 🤍 Economist: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍. Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Or Twitter: 🤍

Why is the Guantánamo Bay prison still open?

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00:11:16
02.02.2022

Two decades of the world’s most notorious prison. Subscribe and turn on notifications 🔔 so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 In 2002, the US opened a prison at its naval base in Guantánamo bay, Cuba. The 9/11 attacks had occurred just months before, and the US was capturing hundreds of men in Afghanistan and Pakistan. It wanted a place to hold and question them. So the Bush administration opened Guantánamo and claimed that it lay outside of US and international law. The detainees didn’t have to be charged with a crime to be imprisoned and the US could hold them as long as they’d like. By 2003, there were nearly 700 men imprisoned in Guantánamo, but there was backlash from around the world. When Barack Obama took office in 2009, he pledged to close Guantánamo. But politics quickly got in the way. He was able to decrease the population but faced legal challenges. Ultimately, no president has been able to close Guantánamo because once something is created outside the law, its impossible to bring it back inside the law. Recommended Reading: Guantánamo Docket: 🤍 Why Obama Can’t Close Guantánamo, Carol Rosenberg 🤍 Guantanamo Diary by Mohamedou Ould Slahi: 🤍 Don’t Forget Us Here: Lost and Found at Guantanamo Bay by Mansoor Adayfi: 🤍 The Struggle to Cover Guantanamo Bay by On the Media: 🤍 Military commissions website: 🤍 Periodic Review Board Website: 🤍 John Bellinger: 🤍 Ramzi Kassem: 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: vox.com/store Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

How “dementia villages” work

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00:07:10
18.08.2022

Can miniature towns make dementia care more humane? Subscribe and turn on notifications 🔔 so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 On any given day at the Hogeweyk, you can see locals wandering the streets, going out for coffee, folding laundry, and tending gardens, all surrounded by lush outdoor space. Located in Weesp, a Dutch city just outside Amsterdam, the Hogeweyk is a planned village intentionally designed for one purpose: maximizing quality of life for its 180 residents — all of whom have severe dementia. Inside, nurses and doctors don’t wear uniforms, meals are cooked inside the home with groceries from the village grocery store, and other Weesp residents are free to dine at the on-site restaurant. These design choices aim to deinstitutionalize senior living, blurring the line between what typically happens in front of residents and what happens out of sight. The style of care that this facility pioneered has been nicknamed the “dementia village,” and it’s been emulated across the world. It’s architecturally organized around choice; by giving residents a high level of freedom, its designers hope to minimize issues associated with dementia like aggression, confusion, and wandering. Read more about The Hogeweyk here: 🤍 Special thanks to Max Winters and Perkins Eastman Make sure you never miss behind-the-scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

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